Home Home Home Home Home Home Home
CakeSpy

Featured Post:
Of Eating Disorders and Food Blogs

 

 Buy my brilliant books!

Buy my new book!

Buy my first book, too! 

CakeSpy Online Retail!

 

Gallery

Fantastic appliance for cake making on DHgate.com

This area does not yet contain any content.
Craftsy Writer

Entries in recipes (582)

Friday
Feb112011

Better Together: Peanut Butter Cup Pocket Pies

True or False: 

  1. Everything's cuter in miniature form.
  2. Pie is so hot right now.
  3. Peanut butter cups are delicious.

Well, I think we all know the answer to all three, and it's certainly not "false". But when these three truths come together in one adorable pocket pie form, they go beyond TRUE to TRUE LOVE.

That's right: Peanut Butter Cup Pocket Pies!

These sweet morsels are the perfect two-bite treat, and tasty as can be with the can't-lose combo of peanut butter and chocolate, all blanketed between two discs of rich, buttery pie crust. 

They'd be cute as pops too, but I think I actually prefer the stick-less version, because they're easier to "pop" in your mouth. 

Here's how you make them.

Peanut Butter Cup Pocket Pies

Makes 12 2-inch pocket pies

 

  • 1 9-inch pie crust, unbaked
  • 12 teaspoons (approx.) creamy peanut butter
  • about 36-40 chocolate chips (milk, semisweet or dark chocolate, your choice)
  • 1 egg, beaten (for egg wash)

You also need: a 2-inch (or so) round cookie cutter, small pastry brush

  1. Prepare a baking sheet by lining it with parchment; set to the side. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.
  2. Roll out your pie crust on a flat, floured surface.
  3. Using a 2-inch (or so) round cookie cutter, cut out as many rounds as you can. It's fine to use other shaped cookie cutters too, but keep it fairly simple (hearts, squares, flower shapes, etc) so that you'll be able to easily seal the pies later. Clump the remaining dough, re-roll, and try to get some more cutouts. If they're kind of ugly, it's ok--use these for the bottom layer of your pocket pies.
  4. Lay out half of the pies on your prepared baking sheet. Place a teaspoon of peanut butter in the center of each, leaving room on the perimeter so you can seal the second half of pie crust on top. Add 3-4 chocolate chips to each, pressing into the peanut butter. 
  5. Using a small pastry brush, brush a small amount of egg wash along the perimeter of each of the peanut butter-filled pie bottoms.
  6. Place the top cutouts on top of each of the peanut buttered and egg washed bottom pieces. Press gently down, and use the tines of a fork to "seal" the pies. I did not vent these on the top. If you want, egg wash the top of the pies too (I didn't, because I forgot. I will be honest.)
  7. Place in the preheated oven; bake for 8-12 minutes, or until golden. 
Monday
Jan312011

Whole Hog: Groundhog Day Cake for Serious Eats

My family has an unusual tradition: we celebrate Groundhog Day. In a completely non-ironic way. And to herald the occasion, there is always a cake-homage to the skittish little critter.

Why? Well, my dad is a surfer, and he carefully follows Punxsutawney Phil's yearly emergence. If he does not see his shadow, it means spring is coming, and thus surf season will come sooner. And also because, well, cake is very delicious.

Of course, no matter whether you're in a rush for spring to come, it's a pretty sure thing that this Groundhog-themed cake will brighten your day—and the remaining crumbs will cast minimal shadows.

For the full entry and recipe, visit Serious Eats!

Monday
Jan242011

Have Some Funfetti: Funfetti Pancakes for Serious Eats

Fact: half of the word "pancake" is comprised of the word "cake". Actually, if you want to get really technical, it's slightly more than half.

And in celebration of bringing more cake to the pan, I'd like to present my newest invention: Funfetti Pancakes.

By lightly modifying a typical cake mix, you can make your own DIY pancake mix; the resulting pancakes are light and fluffy, but sweeter (and in this case, more colorful) than the typical griddle fare. Top them with jam, syrup, or even cake frosting for a morning treat that tastes like sweet fun.

For the full entry (and recipe!) visit Serious Eats!

Sunday
Jan232011

Crispy, Creamy, Gooey: Caramel Pudding Pie in a Rice Krispie Treat Crust

Guess what? Today is National Pie Day. Why today? I don't have a good answer for that, but when I have given you a perfectly good reason to eat pie, your follow-up question shouldn't be "why", but "why not?" and the only thing you should really be concerned with is how you'll celebrate.

Happily, in Seattle, there's an annual Pie Day Party in the Ballard neighborhood; however, even if you're nowhere near Seattle, you can still enjoy this extremely easy and incredibly delicious recipe for Pudding Pie in a Rice Krispie Treat Crust (which, incidentally, is what I will be bringing to the party). Though I used caramel pudding, you could use any flavor you like (vanilla, chocolate, butterscotch, or even pistachio sound good to me) -- either way, the resulting treat, which has a satisfying mix of crunchy, gooey, and creamy textures and flavors, is good to the last bite.

Pudding Pie in a Rice Krispie Treat Crust

Serves about 8

 Ingredients

  • 1 batch Rice Krispie Treat Batter
  • 1 batch instant pudding (3.3 ounce size box)
  • optional: mix-ins for your pudding (chocolate chips, caramel sauce, coconut flakes, etc)

 Procedure

  1. Prepare your pie plate by buttering it generously (the slices can be hard to remove if you don't).
  2. Make Rice Krispie treats as you usually would, in the microwave or on the stovetop; however, instead of pressing the mixture into a square pan as usual, press it into your pie plate, pressing the mixture down on the bottom and up the sides, holding a piece of waxed paper to press so the mixture doesn't stick to your hands. You might not use all of the treat batter; if not, press the remaining mixture into small ramekins or form into Krispie balls to enjoy later.
  3. Let the crust cool completely.
  4. Prepare your instant pudding (typically by whisking the pudding and 2 cups cold milk together until it starts to thicken); if desired, add a handful of chocolate chips, a swirl of caramel, or whatever mix-ins you'd like. Spoon the pudding into your pie crust and keep refrigerated until you're ready to serve it. Ideally, let the pie set for about an hour before serving so the pudding can completely thicken.
  5. Use a very sharp knife to slice, to ensure that you cut through the krispie treat crust; serve using a cake server.

 

 

Friday
Jan212011

Feather in Your Cappuccino: Cappuccino Tapioca Pudding with Cardamom Brulee Recipe

FACT: Pudding is delicious. So why is it that so many home bakers, undaunted by baking cakes, cookies, or even pie crust, are scared to make it?

Could it be they're scared of the dreaded scrambled eggs effect of adding eggs to the hot liquid? Or is it just that it's so much easier to add cold milk, mix, chill, and serve? (Bless you, instant pudding!)

Well, in the new book Serve Yourself: Nightly Adventures in Cooking for One by Joe Yonan, one of the goals is to stress that pudding is something you can (and should) do at home. Don't believe me? Here's a recipe that the publisher was kind enough to share! Sounds good to me!

Cappuccino Tapioca Pudding with Cardamom Brulee
Makes 6 (1/2-cup) servings
  • 3 cups milk, preferably low-fat
  • 1/3 cup small pearl tapioca
  • 1 tablespoon instant espresso powder
  • 2 egg yolks, whisked to combine
  • 1/4 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 1/3 cup plus 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cardamom
  1. Pour 1 cup of the milk into a heavy saucepan. Add the tapioca and let soak for at least 30 minutes.
  2. Pour the remaining 2 cups of milk into a mixing bowl or glass measuring cup, sprinkle the espresso powder over, let it sit for a minute or two, and then stir to dissolve.
  3. Whisk the espresso-milk mixture into the tapioca mixture, along with the egg yolks, salt, and 1/3 cup of the sugar. Over medium heat, slowly bring the mixture just barely to a boil, stirring constantly; it will take 10 to 15 minutes. Reduce the heat until the mixture is barely simmering, and continue cooking the tapioca, stirring occasionally, until the beads swell up and become almost translucent and the custard thickens, another 15 to 20 minutes.
  4. Remove from the heat and let it cool. Spoon the pudding into 6 individual 1/2- cup ramekins and wrap each in plastic wrap, pressing the plastic directly onto the surface of the pudding to prevent a skin from forming. Refrigerate until chilled. It will keep it the refrigerator for several days or in the freezer for up to 2 months.
  5. When you are ready to eat, unwrap one of the ramekins of pudding (thaw it first if frozen), and sprinkle the top with 1 teaspoon of the remaining sugar and a pinch of cardamom. Use a small culinary blowtorch to caramelize the sugar on top, keeping the torch moving so you deeply brown but don’t blacken the sugar, then eat.

Reprinted with permission from Serve Yourself: Nightly Adventures in Cooking for One by Joe Yonan copyright © 2011. Published by Ten Speed Press, a division of Random House, Inc.

Photo credit: Ed Anderson © 2011

Tuesday
Jan182011

Mix it Up: Funfetti Cakelets in the Toaster Oven

Picture this: you've just filled up a cake tin's worth of cupcakes, and you have a dollop of batter left. What to do?

Now, you may think that the possibilities stop at A) Swipe it with your finger (or a spatula) and eat it...or B) Put it in a cupcake liner and bake it all by its lonesome.

Now, these are respectable options, for sure. But I'd like to present another option: bake it in the toaster oven.

I did this recently, and while I wouldn't call it an amazing success, it was thoroughly eatable, and a great sweet fix in a pinch (or late at night, when these things seem like a great idea). And it sure was fun to do.

Here's how I did it.

Toaster Oven Cakelets

 Ingredients

  • 1 dollop leftover Funfetti batter, prepared per box instructions
  • a piece of aluminum foil to bundle it in

Procedure

  1. Place your dollop of cake batter on the center of the aluminum foil. Bunch the sides up around it, to form walls so that the batter won't seep through.
  2. Place the wad in the toaster oven and toast (you heard me, toast) it on medium heat (350 if you have such settings) until it is browned on top, about 15 minutes. Lightly peel away the foil from the side to see if it is baked through. If so, remove from toaster oven, cool, and top with frosting, a dab of ice cream, etc, and enjoy.

 

Thursday
Jan132011

Footloose and Butter and Dairy Free: Vegan Peanut Butter Cookies Recipe

Are you scared of vegans? Well, really, you shouldn't be. Because really, they're a lot like the rest of us. They just don't eat things with butter or milk or eggs. Or, you know, burgers or bacon.

But you know what? Vegans do like cookies. And when Melisser Elliott passed through Seattle to sign and promote her splendid book The Vegan Girl's Guide to Life: Cruelty-Free Crafts, Recipes, Beauty Secrets and More , I made some vegan peanut butter cookies to sweeten the afternoon.

And you know what? Turns out that the vegan cookies were very delicious, and the vegans were very friendly. No need to be scared. Try it at home and see for yourself:

Vegan Peanut Butter Cookies

Makes like 24

  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup packed brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup peanut butter (smooth, no-stir type)
  • 1/2 cup Earth Balance (it's in most grocery stores)
  • 1 egg replacer of your choice (options here)
  • 1 1/4 cups flour
  • 3/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt

Procedure 

  1. Mix sugars, peanut butter, Earth Blance and egg replacement in large bowl.
  2. Stir in remaining ingredients.
  3. Cover and refrigerate about 2 hours or until firm.
  4. Heat oven to 375ºF.
  5. Shape dough into 1 1/4-inch balls.
  6. Place about 3 inches apart on ungreased cookie sheet.
  7. Flatten in crisscross pattern with fork dipped into sugar.
  8. Bake 9 to 10 minutes or until light golden brown. Cool 5 minutes; remove from cookie sheet. Cool on wire rack.
Monday
Jan102011

Seriously Sweet: Crumb Cake Shake for Serious Eats

It's a new year, and some of you might be trying to think of ways to eat healthier.

And on a completely unrelated note, I would like to introduce you to the Crumb Cake Shake.

The inspiration for this shake comes from a coffee cake shake known as the "Mother Futcher" fromTradewinds Cafe of Portland, Maine, famously consumed by Adam Richman on Man Vs. Food. As soon as I saw this frozen treat, I knew I had to make my own version.

Combining two of the world's most perfect foods—crumb cake and ice cream, mixed with a dash of cream for good measure—this shake is an absolute dream, especially when served with a crumb cake wedge as garnish.

For the full "scoop" visit Serious Eats!

Tuesday
Jan042011

Slice of Life: Bob Andy Pie Recipe from Dangerously Delicious Pies

Recently, when leafing through the amazing book Killer Pies: Delicious Recipes from North America's Favorite Restaurants, a conflict presented itself: which recipe to try first?

Happily, the answer presented itself quickly enough, when I found the entry for Dangerously Delicious Pies in Baltimore, Maryland. 

The pie in question? The "Bob Andy". 

What's a Bob Andy Pie, you ask? Well, according to proprietor (part time baker, part time rock musician) Rodney Henry, this pie is "really awesome...I call it 'White Trash Creme Brulee.'" I didn't need any more backstory beyond that: I was already headed to the kitchen.

Happily, the Bob Andy is what is considered a "staple" pie, meaning it contains the basic ingredients most people have in their pantry at any given time. 

Unhappily, it just so happened that just returning from a trip, my pantry was somewhat empty, and I found myself with roughly half of the milk and butter called for in the original recipe. But it occurred to me: is it possible to half a pie recipe? After all, I had split a pie in three parts before, why not just create a foil barrier and bake it as a half-pie?

So I gave it a try, and amazingly, it worked. I had a little extra filling, which I simply baked up as custards in cupcake-cups. I can't say it would work for every type of pie, but I was happy with the result.

Bob Andy Pie, Halved

  • 2 eggs, separated
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1/2 tablespoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons flour
  • 1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, melted
  • 1 1/2 cups milk
  • 1 unbaked round of pie dough (enough for a 9-inch pie), cut into 60/40 portions, of which you'll use the 60 part (use the rest for pie fries!)

Procedure

  1. Preheat the oven to 375.
  2. Prepare your pie dough. Roll it out, and place it in your pie plate. Using a piece of foil, form a barrier in half of the tin, and shape your dough up the side of it, so that you have a sort of makeshift pie semicircle in which to pour your filling.
  3. Mix all of the filling ingredients except for the egg whites together to make a custard.
  4. With a hand mixer, beat the whites in a separate bowl until stiff peaks form, about 5 minutes. Fold the whites into the custard and pour into the pie shell. Bake for 1 hour. 
  5. Remove when it's browned on top, and when (owner's words) "everything moves together. It shouldn't be jiggly like milk."

 

Tuesday
Dec282010

Intensely Delicious: Chocolate Cake Bars Recipe Adapted from Intensely Chocolate by Carole Bloom

I'll tell you the truth: I kind of fainted when I got a personal email from cookbook author and baking legend Carole Bloom. After all, I consider her book The International Dictionary of Desserts, Pastries, and Confections: A Comprehensive Guide With More Than 800 Definitions and 86 Classic Recipes to be an essential reference guide, and every other thing little thing she's done is magic, too. 

But for real, there it was: an invitation to check out her newest book, Intensely Chocolate. With a name like that, what wasn't to love? Sign me up!

Well. Here's the first recipe I tried. Her version is for "Individual Chocolate Bundt Cakes With White Chocolate Passion Fruit Frosting", but you know, I'm not too-too fancy, so I baked the cake batter in a single pan instead, and topped it with delectable brown sugar frosting and Peanut Butter M+M's. But my baking experiment only serves to prove Bloom's prowess: this recipe is easily dressed up or down, and is completely delicious either pinkies-out fancy or footloose and fancy-free.

Chocolate Cake Bars with Brown Sugar Frosting and Deeply Un-Fancy M+M's

Ingredients

  • 6 ounces unsweetened chocolate, finely chopped
  • 1 3/4 cups cake flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher or fine grained sea salt
  • 1 stick (4 ounces) unsalted butter, softened
  • 1 cup superfine sugar
  • 2/3 cup firmly packed light brown sugar
  • 2 large eggs, room temperature
  • 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
  • 1 cup sour cream (I used yogurt)

For the topping

  • 1/2 cup heavy cream
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 3 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder

Procedure

  1. Position the oven rack in the center position. Preheat oven to 350. Coat an 8x8 or 9x13-inch pan with nonstick spray, and line with parchment paper.
  2. Melt the unsweetened chocolate in the top of a double boiler over low heat, stirring often with a rubber spatula to ensure even melting. Remove from heat and set to the side for a moment.
  3. Over a bowl, sift together the flour and baking soda. Add the salt and toss into the blend.
  4. Beat the butter in the bowl of an electric stand mixer using the flat beater attachment until soft and fluffy, about 2 minutes. Add the superfine sugar and brown sugar and beat together well, stopping occasionally to scrape down the sides of the bowl.
  5. Use a fork to lightly beat the eggs and vanilla extract in a small bowl. Add to the butter mixture. Mix together, stopping to scrape down the sides of the bowl every now and again. The mixture may look curdled at first, but as you continue to mix and scrape down the bowl, it will become smooth.
  6. Add the dry ingredients and sour cream in alternate stages, making for about 4-5 total stages of adding ingredients. Mix thoroughly after each addition.
  7. Add the melted chocolate and blend completely.
  8. Pour into your prepared pan.
  9. Bake for 35-50 minutes (since the original recipe for bundt cakes, it called for a bake time of 25-30 minutes, but baking it in a pan takes longer). It's done when a cake tester / toothpick comes out mostly clean.
  10. Remove from oven and transfer to rack to cool completely before cutting. I topped mine with frosting AFTER cutting.
  11. While you wait for the cakes to cool, make yo'self some frosting. Pour the heavy cream into a medium bowl, and whip with an electric mixer. Add sugar, vanilla and cocoa powder; whip until stiff and spreadable. Refrigerate until needed.
  12. Top each cake with a dollop, and with candy if desired (I had extra m+m's from making cornflake wreaths so used them on top).
© Cakespy, all rights reserved. Powered by Squarespace.