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Thursday
Feb212008

Cake Byte: A Super Sweet Giveaway and Cake Poll from Cakespy!

If you read this site, it's likely you're already living the sweet life; but today, life is about to get sweeter still. Why so? Well, we've decided to give away a Cakespy original mini watercolor painting to one lucky reader! Like whoa!


How can you put your name in the running? It's easy! All you need to do is this:

 

 

  • To satisfy our nosy tendencies (we are spies, after all), fill out the below Cake Poll! You can leave your responses in the comment section, or send your responses via email to jessieoleson@gmail.com.
  • At 12pm PST on Sunday, February 24, the Cake Poll will be closed. The winner will be chosen at random, not based on their responses. The original will then be shipped to the lucky winner within 48 hours, via the most economical method.
As for our fine print: The results of this poll will be used for entertainment and Cake Gumshoeing purposes only; we may summarize the results of this poll in upcoming posts. Your private information will not be shared with any outside parties. Also, we've elected to leave the cake poll open to all US Territories, Canada and abroad--so even overseas cake enthusiasts can take part! *As for the prize itself, it is the miniature framed painting pictured at the top and to the left; no substitutions are allowed.

And so, without further ado, let us poke at your most intimate cake details (if emailing your answers, please include your name and the best way to contact you if you win!):

  1. Where did you grow up? Where do you live now?
  2. What were some of the special cakes from your childhood (a Birthday cake? Grandma's German Chocolate? Or perhaps something from the local bakery or supermarket? Anything goes for us as long as it was special to you.)?
  3. Presently, how often do you eat cake or cupcakes? No judgments, we promise.
  4. If you were stranded on a desert island and had to live on one type of cake or cupcake for the rest of your life...what type would it be?
  5. On cupcakes, what is your ideal ratio of cake to frosting? 50/50? 2/3 cake, 1/3 frosting? 3/4 cake, 1/4 frosting? Other?
  6. How do you feel about cakes or cupcakes from mixes?
  7. What's the best thing about eating cake or cupcakes?
  8. Is there a such thing as a bad cake? If so, what makes it bad?
In the meantime, have a very sweet weekend!

 


 

Tuesday
Feb192008

Happy Cakes: Cakespy Offers Sweet Prozac Alternatives for Dull Winter Days

The chocolate boxes are empty; the red roses are wilting. Without a doubt, post-Valentine's Day can be a bummer time of year, with not much other than the chance green-dyed pastry and Irish Soda bread between now and Easter Candy. Happily for you, Cakespy has put together a list of some confectionery Prozac alternatives: happy desserts, perfect for the dark winter days still ahead.


Topping off the list is the Basque Cake (or, if you're feeling authentic and/or fancy, the Gâteau Basque). Really, the Basque cake is probably the embodiment of sunshine in a cake; not a bread, not a pie, not a cake, but some delightful amalgamation of all three, with all sorts of variations depending on where your recipe comes from geographically. As its name would imply, it hails from the Basque region, a magical area that straddles the border between Southern France and Spain, and is traditionally served in June when cherries are plentiful (there's even a cherry festival each June in the town of Itxassou). Just a taste of this cake, with a fruit complement, is like tasting the sun itself, transporting your tastebuds to a warmer climate, surrounded by trees bowed with the weight of their own fruit. Basque in the sun, indeed. Recipe listed below.

Still not happy? What can we say: when life's a drag, get dragées! San Francisco-based Miette Patisserie has just revamped their site and added an online store, so these Frenchie treats can be delivered right to your home. While dragées may also refer to the crunchy-silver ball bearing-esque cake toppings that have been banned in California, the type we're referring to here are what may also be known as Jordan Almonds; entire almonds coated with a sugary shell and finished in lovely pastel colors which the French have been serving up since the 13th century. The contrast of the tender almond with the crunchy, ever-so-slightly vanilla-y sugar coating never fails to bring a smile to our faces; you too can have this joy for just $5 plus shipping by visiting miettecakes.com.

 

Frown not upside down yet? While personally we've begun to suspect that you might be soulless, nonetheless we've got one more fail-safe happy idea, provided by Cake Gumshoe Karen (who also works at a very cool company, Mailbox Tees): an over-the-top Rainbow Layer Cake! While some may say (shun the non-believers) that simply adding food coloring doesn't change a cake's taste and character, we suggest that you hold off on making judgements til you taste this rainbow; we think you'll find that yes, magic does add a little something to the mix. Recipe listed here.


Gâteau Basque (Basque Cake)

Servings: 8
Preparation time: 15 minutes
Cooking time: 25 minutes
Ingredients:
  • 2 cups flour
  • 6 oz (12 Tbs) butter
  • 2 eggs
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 cup black cherry jam
  • 1/2 Tbs butter and 1 Tbs flour to prepare the mold
  • 1 yolk for decorating the cake
Directions:

 

Pre-heat the oven to 400 Degrees Fahrenheit.
Using 1/2 Tb, butter a round 7" pan. Coat the pan with flour.
In a bowl, mix flour, sugar and baking powder together and then add eggs and soft butter.
Split the dough into 2 parts, roll one out and place it in the pan, rising up the side of the pan by 1/2”.
Pour the jam on top of the dough.
Roll the second part of the dough on the table (after sprinkling some flour on the table) to form a round crust the same size as the pan.
Put it on top of the jam and stick the edges with the bottom dough. It is important to keep the jam inside the crust.
Mix an egg yolk with a few drops of water. Paint it on top of the crust.
Place in the oven for 25 minutes.

Recipe thanks to France Monthly.

Want to learn more about all things Basque? Check out The Basque History of the World: The Story of a Nation by Mark Kurlansky. Planning a visit to la belle France? We suggest trying to fit in a visit to the Gâteau Basque Museum (it exists!); find out more at legateaubasque.com

 

 


 

Sunday
Feb172008

Cakespy's Bite of the Big Apple: A Final Roundup of the Ultimate Cakewalk

 

Cookie from Levain

As you may have gathered by recent articles, Cakespy recently spent nine sweet days in New York City. While you've seen a few of our adventures documented through our recent articles about the baked goods of Penn and Grand Central Stations and our review of both Magnolia Bakery locations, we thought it might be fun to review the whole trip in one shot; and so, without further ado, here is a complete recap of our time in the big city:


Cakespy Note: The below tastings involved a revolving cast of eight Cake Gumshoes. And so, while looking at the below it may initially seem like an unrepentant sugar binge, please do consider that when split eight ways, the trip does retain at least a modicum of moderation. Needless to say, we do not suggest trying to replicate this experience all alone!


Day One: The trip begins on a high note when Alaska Airlines serves Cougar Mountain cookies, which are a local Seattle company whose granola-y cookies are chewy, vaguely healthy tasting but sweet enough to still be good. The flight to EWR is long, but we cheer right up when we arrive at the hotel and find what we now understand is a Doubletree Hotel standard: warm cookies upon arrival. The cookies themselves are good, but the surprise factor of receiving a warm cookie gives them bonus points. Clearly, this is going to be a sweet trip.

Day Two:
The day begins by indulging in our favorite corn muffins in the city: the gorgeous, sweet, slightly crisp-at-the-edges corn muffins of Muffins Café on the Upper West Side. Perfection. Several hours of secret spy work ensue, but our energy is renewed with a crumb cake from Belly Delly, perched on the outer edges of Times Square; it's priced high, likely because of its touristy location, but it's good; although we cannot confirm it with evidence beyond our own expert palates, judging by texture, taste and look, it does appear to be from the same wholesaler who supplies crumb cake to the EuroPan Café in Penn Station.

Day Three: On day three things get serious. First, Head Spy Jessie takes a jaunt on the N train over to Queens, where she visits French Culinary student and talented baker (and Cakespy fan!) Kelly (check out some of her work here and here) at her place of employment, the sweet-smelling and even better tasting Dolce Italia Bread and Pastry, where she picks up an assortment of biscotti to-go. While in Astoria she also finds time to visit several other spots in the area, hitting up Martha’s Country Bakery for a black and white cupcake and Rose & Joe's for a cannoli (though their pizza looked extremely tempting as well). Bearing bakery boxes and bags aplenty, she returns to Manhattan, making quick stops at Magnolia Bakery’s Downtown location and looping by to at least look in the window at Rocco's (killer black and whites) en route to a rendez-vous lunch with several other Cake Gumshoes at Ray’s Pizza on 6th ave at 11th (veggie slices are the main choice). Much of the morning's acquisitions are consumed, and the biscotti is declared a buttery, crunchy delight; the cupcake, while it does not resemble a black and white cookie, is moist and good; the cannoli from Rose & Joe's is crispy, creamy and all the things a cannoli should be.

However, some of our crew is still feeling a bit peaked after the light repast, so we make our way over to the Uptown Magnolia location to see the real difference between both locations (read about it here). But then again, is a trip uptown ever really complete without a visit to Levain Bakery? Never have we truly had the feeling of walking into a chocolate chip cookie as we’ve had walking into this place, where the smell envelops you and the cookies ($3.75 ea.) are as big as a baby and just as heavy. Oh yeah, heavy. Walking back toward our hotel via Broadway puts us face to face with Fairway, where we can't help but pick up one of their enormous, Carbohydratey with a Capital C buttermilk biscuits--you know, for later.

Day Four: Is it a surprise that we wake up jonesing? The day starts by picking up a pack of mini black and whites at Starbucks. Alas, they are not excellent, but we do enjoy the novelty of finding them--awfully cute. Things remain sweet for the day with leftovers from the previous day's jaunts, and when we over to Brooklyn for dinner at carribean-vegetarian-hipster joint Mighty Diamond in Williamsburg, the sweetest surprise is the rich vegan chocolate rum cake, which is made in-house. Talk about a diamond in the rough.

 


Day Five: The day starts with a visit to Donut Pub on 14th Street, where the donuts are greasy and unapologetically old-school (this is a good thing); defying tradition though, we pick up a black and white cookie, which have clearly just been frosted (this is also a good thing). Worth noting: they also offer "whites" and "blacks" separately, a concept which seems appealing to those who prefer one flavor or the other, but which in reality is sort of disconcerting. Things stay cozy with hot chocolate from Max Brenner . Later on, after getting the special "manicure-and-a-drink" for $10 at Beauty Bar, we walk down to the fairly new Sugar Sweet Sunshine, recommended by Cake Gumshoe Ian, one of the tasters on day three. Initially we don't know what to make of it: it seems like walking into your hipster friend's living room for cupcakes, but does this mean that you could do it just as well at home? Perhaps, but it's so much funner to let them do it for you: the pistachio cupcake was like sunshine on the cold night, and the Sexy Red Velvet Cake...well, it was sexy all right. We nightcap with espresso at Caffe Roma, and though we didn't get any pastries on this visit, we have known and loved their cannoli in the past. Sigh.

Day Six: Starting out early we drop by Whole Foods Columbus Circle just as they are opening, and are pleasantly surprised by their excellent (made in-house!) vegan chocolate chip cookies, which are still warm at the time of our visit. The calories burn off nicely zigzagging cross and down to Grand Central, where we pick up goodies at several locations but can't help taking a bite of the Little Pie and Co. cupcakes immediately. While we don't buy anything at Balducci's, it is worth mentioning that we stop in and see that they have cupcakes from Two Little Red Hens and Crumbs. After a day of toil, a few spies still have enough energy to head over to Billy's Bakery in Chelsea, where the cupcakes are sweet and so is the decor. A crumb is dropped on the sidewalk, and a lengthy conversation ensues about the validity of the "Five Second Rule".

Day Seven: We start the day by taking the grand tour of Penn Station and then continue on through Chelsea, pausing to taste chocolate mice at La Bergamote and handmade raspberry marshmallows at Three Tarts, making our way down to the Village for lovely nonpareils at Li-Lac and gorgeous pastries at Lafayette Bakery, where the service can be gruff but the pastry is so, so sweet. We also walk one of our favorites, Amy's Bread, but hold off for the time being. After a light dinner at Kate's Joint, we simply can't take another bite, but do enjoy the visuals at The Grey Dog's Coffee, where the cookies and pies (made in-house) look awfully good, walking back west via St. Mark's Place, we notice that Whole Earth Bakery (where we love the vegan brownies and vegan truffles) offers Vegan Trifle--vegans may want to take note!

Day Eight: Resisting sugar overload for just one more day, Head Spy Jessie trains it over to Brooklyn, meeting up with the charming Ann of Redacted Recipes to ogle the cakes and goodies at Cheeks in Brooklyn (picked up a triple-chocolate brownie for later) and to have a homey cupcake at Sweet Farm (sidebar on Sweet Farm: we had visited, but not sampled, this bakery on a previous visit; the cases had not been incredibly enticing at that time. However, things were much better-looking on this visit, so it looks like they have a good rhythm going now). It was the end of the day and the frosting had reached the point of having the ever-so-slightest crunch; while some may not enjoy this, we do. Perfection after a long day of flaneur-esque wandering.

Day Nine: There's only time for a little spying today, with a trip to the airport imminent; luckily, we make good use of our time, imbibing a simply gorgeous coffee at Joe and managing to fit in a quick visit to the adorable Thé Adoré on West 13th street and running over to the East Village for pastries to go at DeRobertis, Venieros and Something Sweet before catching the plane home. On the plane, they serve a brownie by Love and Quiches. We'd call that a sweet ending indeed.

Home again: Finally, on the ninth day, Head Spy Jessie returns home, and the NYC-based Cake Gumshoes get a chance to rest and digest. Would you give these spies some vegetables please?

What I am after my NYC Trip

Places listed in this post:
Amy's Bread: Three locations, visit amysbread.com.
Balducci's: Two locations in Manhattan, visit balduccis.com.
Beauty Bar: 231 E. 14th St.; online at beautybar.com.
Belly Delly: 1625 Broadway, (212)333-5650. Times Square.
Billy's Bakery: 184 9th Ave., (212)647-9956; online at billysbakerynyc.com.
Cheeks Bakery: 378 Metropolitan Avenue, Brooklyn, (718)599-3583; online at cheeksbakery.com.
Cougar Mountain Cookies: online at cmbc.com.
Crumbs Bakeshop: Various locations; online at crumbsbakeshop.com.
De Robertis Pasticceria: 176 1st Ave., (212) 674-7137; online at derobertiscaffe.com.
Dolce Italia Bread & Pastry: 36-06 Ditmars Blvd., Astoria, Queens; (718)278-4188.
Donut Pub: 203 W. 14th St., (212)929-0126.
Doubletree Hotel: Various locations; online at doubletree.hilton.com.
Fairway: Various locations; visit fairwaymarket.com.
The Grey Dog's Coffee: Two locations in Manhattan; online at thegreydog.com.
Joe--The Art of Coffee: Various locations; online at joetheartofcoffee.com.
Kate's Joint: 58 Avenue B., (212)777-7059.
La Bergamote: 169 9th Ave., (212)627-9010.
Lafayette Bakery: 26 Greenwich Ave., (212)242-7580.
Levain Bakery: 167 W. 74th St., (212)874-6080; online at levainbakery.com.
Li-Lac Chocolates: Various locations; online at li-lacchocolates.com.
Little Pie & Co: Various locations; online at littlepiecompany.com.
Love and Quiches: Online at loveandquiches.com.
Magnolia Bakery: Downtown, 401 Bleecker St.; Uptown, 200 Columbus Ave., (212) 724-8101; online at magnoliabakery.com.
Martha's Country Bakery: 3621 Ditmars Blvd., Queens; (718)545-9737.
Max Brenner: Various locations; online at maxbrenner.com.
Mighty Diamond: 347 Graham Ave., Brooklyn; (718)384-7778
Muffins Cafe: 222 Columbus Ave., (212)875-1173.
Ray's on 6th (AKA Famous Ray's): 465 6th Ave. at 11th St., (212)243-2253.
Rocco's Pastry: 243 Bleecker St., (212)242-6031.
Rose & Joe's: 2240 31st St., Astoria, Queens; (718)721-9422.
Something Sweet: 177 1st Ave., #1; (212)533-9986.
Sugar Sweet Sunshine Bakery: 126 Rivington St., (212)995-1960; online at sugarsweetsunshine.com.
Starbucks: Various Locations; just look around, you'll probably see one.
Sweet Farm: 158 Bedford Ave., Brooklyn; (212)384-0158.
The Adore: 17 E. 13th St., (212)243-8742.
Three Tarts: 164 9th Ave., (212)462-4392; online at 3tarts.com.
Two Little Red Hens: 1652 2nd Ave., (212)452-0476; online at twolittleredhens.com.
Veniero's Pastry Shop: 342 E. 11th St., (212)674-7070; online at venierospastry.com.
Whole Earth Bakery & Kitchen: 130 St. Marks Place; (212)677-7597.
Whole Foods: Various locations; online at wholefoods.com.

 


 

Thursday
Feb142008

Cakewalk in Grand Central Station, NYC

 

Little Pie and Co.
We can't help but think of NYC's Grand Central Station as Penn Station's better-groomed cousin. Where Penn Station has Houlihan's, Grand Central has the Oyster Bar; where Penn Station leads to Long Island and New Jersey, Grand Central will take you to old-money spots like Greenwich, or old-school spots like New Haven. And while we will always bear a loyalty to Penn Station (after all, much of the Cakespy crew is either NJ-raised or based), we can't help but wonder how the other half lives, and more importantly, what kind of pastries they eat; it was in this spirit that we recently took a grand tour of the Grand Station. Here's what we saw (and ate):

Cakespy Note: Grand Central Station is located at 42nd Street at Park Avenue in Manhattan. In terms of eateries, you'll see that we designate each spot as being located in one of three spots: the Upper Level, Grand Central Market is a Farmer's Market-esque setup, located in a corridor leading to Lexington Avenue; second, the Lower Level, Dining Corridor; third, the few miscellaneous spots sprinkled throughout the terminal are designated as being located on the Upper Level, Outer Corridors

Central Market Grill: We have never tasted the sandwiches or savory fare at this deli. But then again, why should we, when we've found what need and crave, right by the register? Their crumb cake alone is worth a visit: big, buttery, brown-sugary crumbs the size of walnuts (how we like it!) and gorgeous, hefty cake to anchor it. We hear they do offer other things too though. Lower Level, Dining Corridor.



Ciao Bella: What is gelato, anyway? We used to believe the direct translation was "Italian ice cream that costs five dollars", but with some help from one of our favorite books, Everything you Pretend to Know About Food (and Are Afraid Someone Will Ask) by Nancy Rommelmann, we are informed that

while Italian ice cream uses the same basic ingredients as American, the final product is not churned and aerated to the extent that American ice cream is; nor is it stabilized with things like gelatin, which is added to slow the melting process. The result is a more velvety ice cream of incomparable richness.

And certainly Ciao Bella's rich, velvety version has rendered us believers in this Italian treat, more than willing to shell over our cash, clamoring for a fix. Lower Level, Dining Corridor; online at ciaobellagelato.com.

 

Corrado Bread and Pastry: Nestled right by the Lexington Avenue exit, this place is worth holding out for before emerging into the city: featuring gorgeous cakes (just look at the texture of that frosting!), crisp, crumbly cookies, and a dazzling array of breads (including the Pain D'Avignon featured in NY Magazine), it's a delight, and we've found service to be very friendly here. Upper Level, Grand Central Market.


 

Dishes: Decisions, decisions: with two locations, one on the upper level and one on the lower level, which to choose? Upstairs, deli-style puddings and platters of creamy tiramisu reign, available by the generous scoop. Downstairs, carbohydrates have a more prominent showing, with a tantalizing display of cookies and the object of our affections, the delectable doughnut muffin. We say go carby: the spoon-and-fork only desserts, delicious as they may be, are probably not the best choice for a commute. Locations both in the Upper Level Grand Central Market and the Lower Level Dining Corridor; online at dishestogo.com. 

Hot & Crusty: Our review for the Penn Station locations holds true here: to paraphrase, we've had touch-and-go experiences here, as some of the pastries tend to look better than they taste. Nonetheless, their crumb cakes and sprinkle-topped cookies are usually a good bet, and it is always warm and smells like sugary perfection when you walk in. Upper Level, Outer Corridors; online at hotandcrusty.com.
 

Junior's: They're the celebrated cheesecake from Brooklyn, with its trademark sponge cake layer. But really, is visiting the Grand Central location the best way to experience it? We say hold out for the flagship location on Flatbush and Dekalb in Brooklyn; while the cheesecake itself may not be life-changing, savoring it with an authentic egg cream while gazing at the photos on the wall is certainly a rich experience in itself. Various locations, Upper and Lower Levels; online at juniorscheesecake.com. 

Li-Lac: They're not Godiva, nor do they strive to be; and while this is noble, this is not the main reason we love Li-Lac. We love them for their creamy, melt-in-your-mouth non-pareils and their creamy truffles...but of course, also for their visually stunning cases full of chocolates and candies which recall small-town confection shops from a simpler era. Upper Level, Grand Central Market; online at li-lacchocolates.com.

 

Little Pie and Co.: While we could spend a good deal of time rhapsodizing about their flaky crust, their tantalizingly golden, buttery-brown-sugary topped apple pie, we cannot ignore their equally excellent cakes, which far exceeded our expectations of what a pie-branded business might offer: moist, not too-light cake, with creamy, dreamy frosting. Lower Level, Dining Concourse; online at littlepiecompany.com. 

Paninoteca: As wrap sandwiches wither as a sandwich trend of bygone years, the panini is on top of the world; and while sandwiches may come and go, cannoli is forever. And Paninoteca's, while not the best we've had, is highly decent for a treat that is not easy to find in Midtown: crisp shells encasing a truly decadent puff of sweet ricotta cream. Lower Level, Dining Concourse.


Zaro's Bread Basket: If a tree falls in the woods, does another Zaro's Bread Basket open? It sure seems that way based on how many of them there are between Grand Central and Penn Station. But this is a chain whose proliferation is just fine with us: their cakes are tasty, their displays are gorgeous, and they tailor to their surroundings: we love the "Grand Central" cupcakes (left). Upper Level, Grand Central Market; online at zaro.com.

Did we miss your favorite Metro -North hotspot? Let us know!



 

Tuesday
Feb122008

Batter Chatter: Interview with Kari Haskell of Retro Bakery, Las Vegas

The prospect of a new bakery is always exciting to the Cakespy crew...but a new bakery which cleverly marries kitsch, cupcakes and the Atomic Age of the 50's and 60's? That puts us in an absolute fever, as is the case with newly-opened (just this past Sunday!) Retro Bakery in Las Vegas. We had a few moments to talk with proprietress Kari Haskell about her thoughts and feelings on the eve of their opening; here's what we learned about opening day emotions, the truth about pie vs. cake, and why some cakes simply must be served cold:  

Cakespy: First off--how do you feel with the opening just around the corner?
Kari Haskell: It's my adult dream come true (my teenage self had NO idea that I would want to go back to a type of small town living)! I grew up in a small town in Oregon that had a main street (Third St. in McMinnville, OR), and my grandparents owned two business there: a pharmacy and a grill restaurant. I would walk there all the time and pick up $.25 candy or Hallmark cards or whatever. I also wanted to leave that kind of life the SECOND I got out of college (I went to college in a small town too!).
I moved to Southern California and met my husband, Brian, and then we began a life of climbing the ladder of corporate restaurants. Brian was a GM of Red Robin for 8 years and an Assistant GM for BJ's Brewhouse for all of last year. All of this while I stayed home and raised our girls, Abbi (9) and Lucy (2)...while watching him work 12-14 hour shifts five (sometimes six) days a week and sometimes commuting two hours (back in the California days)! We're used to long hours!
Having our commute be three minutes (10 by walking) is fantastic. It's created that small-town feel again that I totally craved after being controlled by a corporate entity for so long!! No one will tell us where we should move to "move up" ever again! That is the MOST exciting part for Brian.
My exciting part? Being the neighborhood bakery that my neighbors and friends can enjoy! Now I know why my grandparents LOVED their work so much. It's so great to be so close, know your customers, and actually be a part of where you live.

CS: Can you tell us a bit about how you decided to open Retro Bakery?
KH: I've been baking since I was a Sophomore in high school, when we had to bake a cake and a pie from scratch. The task at first seemed completely impossible to me. I thought cake only came from a box. After I baked my first pie, I was hooked. I started baking the pies for every holiday every year. I still use the same crust recipe from that Food 101 class. It's truly the BEST, and I've tried them all.
The cake part came later. For some reason, I was intimidated by cake: it could fall; it would be lumpy or sideways...too many variables. Fast forward 14 years, and I meet Kristie Fleisher who is the BEST cook I know. Kristie is always into trying new recipes and new ideas. Last year, she was trying baking cakes from scratch, and she totally inspired me. I started baking cakes in my kitchen, and realized it wasn't as hard as my teenage self thought!
I then noticed that EVERYTHING I was reading in the news or on TV was about cupcakes! That got me thinking about flavors and ideas that could work with cupcakes (cakes were just too big to test on...and cupcakes are WAY cuter!) I started researching ideas of what was out there already (WAY more than I thought!), and I found that my ideas where pretty unique, and tasted good enough to sell! Then I realized that cupcakes were literally taking over the world, and between my baking talent and my husband's restaurant knowledge, we could do this!
We are so lucky to be in a big city like Las Vegas, but even luckier to be in a section of town that is growing so rapidly and doesn't have a lot of established businesses yet. Our neighbors are always hungry for something new, especially if it's a family-owned store!

CS: Can you tell us some of the ways that the "Retro" aspect will be played out in the retail location?
KH: The name Retro Bakery comes from my love of the "Atomic Era" of the 1950s and early 1960s. I have always loved the bold colors, simplicity of design, and "Tupperware Party" quality of life. I used that aesthetic in the bakery decor: clean, simple, bold design. I also try to have "retro" flavors (not necessarily from the '50s...): Mint Chocolate Chip, Peanut Buttercup, Coffee and Donuts, Peanut Butter and Honey (my favorite sandwich of ALL TIME), and Cinnamon Toast (just to name a few)!

CS: It looks like your focus will be cupcakes, but will you be offering other baked goods at Retro Bakery?
KH: I like to focus on cupcakes because they are so cute and small (and also VERY popular right now), and also because I LOVE them! It's the perfect dessert! I will offer pies year-round by special order, but we will have a "Pie Season" during the holidays when I will exclusively do pies (Double Pecan and Spicy Pumpkin) and only have cupcakes by special order. We can also bake any of our cupcake flavors into 9-inch, double-layer cakes because some people will always want a cake!

CS: You've been trying out some really fun recipes (creamsicle cupcakes, caramel corn cupcakes, etc)--which one are you most excited about?
KH: Honestly, every time I try a flavor, THAT'S my favorite. It's so funny...I'll bake it and say, "OH! Now THIS is my favorite!" I'm most excited about the next one knockin' around in my head...I literally DREAM about flavors, so I have quite a few waiting to be created. My latest, Caramel Corn, was a HUGE hit...so much so, I almost called my menu printer and halted printing, so I could add it to my regular menu! But, we decided that it could wait, and we'll probably have it as one of our "Seasonal Flavors" that will change every month...I'm thinking May or June in honor of baseball season. The cool part is that it's OUR decision to make!

CS: How do you decide which flavors make the cut?
KH: Many tests with my family and friends...I think they may be tired of my shoving cupcakes in their faces!

Cakespy Note: Somehow we doubt that anyone is getting tired of having cupcakes shoved in their faces.

 

 

 

CS: Are there any bakers, cookbooks or websites in particular that inspire you?
KH: My Great Auntie Marm is my baking inspiration. She's been baking bread and goodies for the entire town of McMinnville, OR, for the last 60 years! As far as websites: CAKESPY, of course (Cakespy Note: We did not pay for or bribe Kari in any way to say that. Really. What can we say, the girl's got good taste)! As well as Cupcakes Take the Cake. Both of those have SO many inspirational interviews, flavor ideas, decorating ideas....it TOTALLY sparks my imagination. Also, many people on flickr.com. There are too many to mention...but I look at EVERYONE to see new trends coming or if my stuff can measure up!

CS: What types of pastries are popular in Las Vegas? Any local specialties?
KH: This is a tough question, since I don't actively seek out pastries. I'm a salt-a-holic! I can tell you where the best french fries are (BJ's and Red Robin)!

Las Vegas is truly a divided place: Locals and Tourists. The Strip is full of gourmet pastry chefs making spectacular stuff....but locals really have limited places to find baked goods. I've found Cakes by Ruth, Nothing Bundt Cakes, and Cake World to have the best cakes. I'm sure there are others, but not up in Centennial Hills.

 

CS: Be honest. Which do you like better, pie or cake?
KH: Oooohhhh...you're bad! I'll say pie CRUST and ANY buttercream frosting. I suppose the best thing in the world would be pie crust FILLED with buttercream! I think I may have stumbled upon a new fad! (Cakespy Note: This sounds like pleasure overload to us.)

CS: To you, what is the most important aspect in making a quality baked good?
KH: FLAVOR and MOISTURE. I love making flavors people don't expect for cupcakes, and in this desert climate, it's a constant battle to keep your cakes MOIST!

CS: With regard to cupcakes and cakes, there is some controversy about the temperature at which they should be served. In your opinion, should they be chilled, or room temperature?
KH: I know why some are chilled now! Cream cheese frostings are required to be chilled (Health Department rules!). I prefer room temp and also a day old! Weird, I know. But I like a little crunch in my frosting...and I really don't like cream cheese frosting. This could get me in a lot of trouble!

CS: Out of pure nosiness--when you're not baking, what are some of your other interests or hobbies?
KH: Decorating is my second passion. (I'm totally inspired by Todd Oldham right now!) I also LOVE writing. I totally in love with all things BLOG.


CS: One of your employees, Kristie, is listed as Cake Specialist / Head Cheerleader. We're intrigued. Does this mean she majored in culinary arts and minored in Rockette arts?
KH: She has been my biggest supporter from DAY ONE. She's my go-to if I have cake problems...or mental problems.

 

CS: If you could go back in time and give yourself advice when you were just starting out with this project, what advice would you give?
KH: It's going to cost more than you think! You hear that one all the time, but IT WILL! We were thinking $50K, but that was just us not knowing ANYTHING about city codes, leasing spaces, appliances...now we know! It all adds up QUICKLY!

Are you in the Las Vegas area? Lucky you; Retro Bakery is located at 7785 N. Durango Drive, #130, Las Vegas; online at retrobakerylv.com.

Not in Las Vegas? Happily, you can still catch a sugar high by checking out their blog at buildingabakery.blogspot.com, or by browsing their drool-worthy Flickr photos at flickr.com/photos/retrobakery.


 

Sunday
Feb102008

Red-Hot: Have a Red Velvet Valentine's Day, With Love from Cakespy

 

Red Velvet Cupcakes at Saint Cupcake

Valentine’s day, that polarizing bitch of a holiday, is just around the corner--a holiday loved or hated depending on romantic status. Well, this year we're raging against the red velvet chocolate box in favor of Red Velvet Cake! No problem if you're unattached-- just more cake for you. Really, no matter where you are in life and/or love, you're bound to have a sweet Valentine's Day with these red-hot Red Velvet suggestions:

Here: For if you, like the Cakespy headquarters, are in Seattle...

 

Seattle loves Red Velvet! If you're in the Emerald City, don’t miss some of our favorite Red Velvet cupcakes around, at Café Sweet Posie in Ballard—or try a slice at the Kingfish Cafe in Capitol Hill. South of Seattle? No problem--hello, cupcake in Tacoma's got you covered with sweet and adorable Red Velvet cupcakes with a southern (well, south of Seattle, anyway) flair!


There: Not in Seattle? Perhaps you can find Red Velvet Nirvana at one of these spots in your town:

If you’re in NYC, be sure to stop by Sugar Sweet Sunshine on Manhattan's Lower East Side for some of their Sexy Red Velvet Cake (photo left) which certainly lives up to its name! There’s also a damn fine one at Cake Man Raven, not to mention Cheeks Bakery--the latter two both in Brooklyn.

In Portland, we hear that Saint Cupcake makes a mean Vegan Red Velvet Cupcake, and their dairy ones are no slouch either (photo top)!

Or perhaps you’re in Chicago? Trust the expert opinion of Natalie from Bake + Destroy!, who suggests hitting up Molly's Cupcakes not only for their awesome Red Velvet cupcakes but for their cute decor too.

Or if you’re in San Francisco, check out Cake Gumshoe Bridget’s favorite: red velvet cupcakes from That Takes the Cake.

In central New Jersey, they really know how to make Red Velvet layer cakes right at The Baker Boys in Ocean Grove (photo left).

Even in Britain, you can still get your stateside fix: Outsider Tart, opened by American expats, happily serves up delicious Red Velvet in London.

Everywhere: Online and accessible no matter where you are:

 

 


Not into Red? Think Pink with the Pink Velvet Cake from Zabar’s (photo left), which can be shipped anywhere in the US (2-day shipping required). As an added bonus, part of the sale price goes toward Breast Cancer Research--and we can all feel good about contributing to that cause! Available at zabar.com.
On a diet? Shame on you. Nonetheless, we have a sweet and calorie-free suggestion: get crafty with Red Velvet Soap dyes from the lovely and amazing Brambleberry


Can’t bother with pre-orders or leaving the house? Well, we've got the thing for you, too: a recipe for Red Velvet Black and White Cookies, which will appear in an upcoming issue of Every Day With Rachael Ray:
Red Velvet Black & White Cookies

 

Makes 10 large cookies
Prep Time: 40 minutes
Bake Time: 15 minutes


Ingredients:
  • 1 ¼ cups flour
  • 1 tablespoon unsweetened cocoa powder
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 1 stick (4 ounces) unsalted butter, at room temperature
  • ¾ cup granulated sugar
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 tablespoon red food coloring
  • 1 ½ teaspoons pure vanilla extract
  • ½ cut buttermilk
  • 2 cups confectioners’ sugar
  • 2 tablespoons corn syrup
  • 4 ounces semisweet chocolate
Directions:

 

1. Preheat the oven to 350oF. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. In a medium bowl, sift together the flour, cocoa, baking soda and salt.
2. Using a mixer, beat 5 tablespoons butter with the granulated sugar until fluffy, 3 minutes.

3. Beat in the egg, food coloring and 1 teaspoon vanilla. Beat in the flour mixture alternately with the buttermilk until smooth.
4. Place ¼-cup scoops of batter 2 inches apart on the prepared baking sheet; spread out. Bake until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out dry, 12 to 15 minutes. Let the cookies sit for 5 minutes, then transfer to a rack to cool.
5. In a bowl, whisk together the confectioners’ sugar, remaining ½ teaspoon vanilla, 1 tablespoon corn syrup and 2 tablespoons hot water until smooth. In another bowl, combine the chocolate, remaining 3 tablespoons butter and 1 tablespoon corn syrup; microwave until melted, about 1 minute.
6. Coat the cookies with the vanilla, then the chocolate icing. Refrigerate until set, about 20 minutes.
Happy Valentine's Day! Xoxoxo, Cakespy

 

 

 

Thursday
Feb072008

Cakewalk in Penn Station, NYC

 

Au Bon Pain, Penn Station

New York City's Pennsylvania Station is lovingly referred to as "the home of the dashing commuter", and anyone who's had the pleasure of visiting during rush hour will know this to be a very apt description. It's certainly not for the feint of heart--slow down here and you're likely to get knocked over by suit-and-sneaker clad commuters barreling on by to the 5:23 to Ronkonkoma. Luckily, we know exactly what will give you the strength to deal with the jostling crowds--sweet, sugary pastries. While you won't find Payard here, there are a lot of ways to obtain a good old-fashioned (and at moments, a little bit trashy) sugar jolt at Penn Station; here are our favorite ways to do so:

Cakespy Note: Pennsylvania Station (and thus, all of the below purveyors of sweets listed below) is located on 34th Street between 7th and 8th Avenues in Manhattan; there are two main levels, the "Upper" level housing New Jersey Transit, and the Lower Level housing the Long Island Railroad. Locations are noted in the below Cakewalk as being on the Upper or Lower level.
Au Bon Pain: Yes, they are a chain, with locations around the country, but we have never been disappointed by their crunchy shortbread cookies or crumb cake, which has just the right degree of buttery saltiness to satisfy the palate. Just don't look at the nutrition information which they insist on posting visibly in the cafe--you don't need to do that to yourself. Just enjoy your sweets. On our most recent visit, the Creme de Fleur pastries (title photo) were divine. Lower level, LIRR; online at aubonpain.com.

Auntie Anne's Pretzels: There's a sign by this little pretzel kiosk that says "Snack like you mean it" and this isn't hard when you have cinnamon-sugar dusted pretzels or pretzel bites to keep you company on your long (or short, we're not particular) train ride. Also, we can't help but feel a nostalgia when we go here--it reminds us of being sixteen and getting pretzels and lemonade at the mall in New Jersey. Upper Level, NJ Transit; online at auntieannes.com.

Don Pepi Deli: Although we think their pizza across the hall is better than their deli sandwiches, they do have yogurt muffins and cookies that will make your commute a whole lot happier at this location. What we like about the yogurt muffins is that they seem to maintain a nice moisture and freshness, while not being as heavy as some of their counterparts; the cookies are of that big, crunchy deli variety that never fail to bring us a smile. Upper Level, NJ Transit.

Dunkin' Donuts: Clearly the commuters need caffeine to keep on dashing, and Dunkin Donuts is available for that need--there are several locations and kiosks throughout Penn Station on both levels. As we've mentioned before, they don't have the best quality donuts we've ever tasted...but there's just something so perfect about them anyway. Various locations on both the Upper and Lower Levels; online at dunkindonuts.com.


EuroPan Cafe: We'd never tried this spot before, but found their sweets to be a pleasant surprise, with a nice array of carbohydrate-laden treats. Most of the pastries are from various wholesalers, but they do have our favorite type of deli crumb cake, and a nice array of cookies, cakes, cupcakes and several more Frenchie-type pastries. Lower Level, LIRR.

 

Hot & Crusty: It always smells and looks good in here, but if we are to be completely honest, we've found that a lot of their pastries look better than they taste--the Black and White cookies in particular. However, they do have a very decent crumb cake, and other cookies (sprinkle-topped and M&M varieties) are quite good. Lower Level, LIRR; online at hotandcrusty.com.

Krispy Kreme: In all honesty we'd choose Dunkin' Donuts every time over Krispy Kreme, but we're taking this one for the team because we know there are Krispy Kreme die-hards out there (although if you're one of them, can you please explain what the attraction is?). We will admit that the holiday special donuts they bring out (Heart-shaped Valentine's Day donuts were on display when we went) are awfully cute. Upper Level, NJ Transit; online at krispykreme.com.

Le Bon Cafe: Mostly average sweets of the caliber that you'd get at a typical NYC deli--rich and satisfying, but not necessarily subtle or unique. Nonetheless, they fulfill that need that you sometimes have for something sweet and familiar. However, they do get bonus points for having a novelty we have not seen before: Black and White Rice Krispie Treats--a very nice variation on two classics! Lower Level, LIRR.


Sedutto Cafe: Sedutto is a good spot to pick up some Jersey-shore style soft-serve before your commute. What we love best here though is the cones, which are chocolate-dipped and coated with various types of sprinkles and nuts, which add a nice texture to the cone, and lend a certain "happy" factor to the overall experience. Various locations on both Upper and Lower Levels; online at seduttosicecream.com.

 

 

Zaro's Bread Basket: Zaro's Bread Basket may have a monopoly over the train station business (they have multiple locations in both Penn and Grand Central Stations) but all things considered, they do a pretty good job: solid black and white cookies, cakes, and unique cone shaped cupcakes have kept us going through many a ride down to the Jersey Shore on the train. We don't love their "regular" cupcakes as much as their cakes, but of course we welcome you to choose your own adventure. They're our top pick in terms of good-looking bakery cases, with colorful and ogle-worthy displays. Various locations on both Upper and Lower Levels; online at zaro.com. 
Penn Station Signage Penn Station Departures
Have we missed your favorite commuter sweet spot? Let us know!

 

Tuesday
Feb052008

West Side Story: A Tale of Two Magnolias

Cupcakes, Magnolia Downtown
Magnolia Bakery, a landmark in NYC’s West Village, is the veritable shot that started the cupcake revolution. And now, they’ve opened a second location on NYC’s Upper West Side.Though in actuality these two locations are only about three miles away, in many ways they are worlds apart; the culture, clientele and location are distinctly different. But what does this all mean for those famous cupcakes? We did a side by side comparision to find out who really does take the cake. For ease of reading, we will refer to them as "Magnolia Downtown" for the original Bleecker Street location and "Magnolia Uptown" for the new Upper West Side location.

A little background...

Location: Both bakeries are in Manhattan; Magnolia Downtown is located at the corner of West 11th Street and Bleecker Street in the West Village; Magnolia Uptown is located on 69th Street at Columbus Avenue, on the Upper West Side.

Culture: While both are neighborhoods of privilege (in our humble eyes, neighborhoods where apartments regularly rent for upwards of $3,000 a month would classify as neighborhoods of privilege), they both have a distinctly different feel; whereas Greenwich Village has a more eclectic feel, with cozy brownstones, zigzagging streets and quaint boutiques and boasts celebrity residents like Julianne Moore and Sarah Jessica Parker, the Upper West Side boasts the grand old apartment buildings of yesteryear, and you just might find yourself brushing elbows with with residents like Bono and Mia Farrow.

Some details about our visits and impressions...

Crowd: We went to the locations one after the other to get the truest read. When we went to Magnolia downtown at 11.30 am, there were about 5 people in line; Uptown 30 minutes later, there were about 16 people in line. However, we feel it would be unfair to say this means that Uptown is more popular; it's newer, so part of this is probably novelty; also, we do understand that as lunchtime draws closer, sometimes you need a little sweetness, so perhaps that 30 minute window does make a difference.

Employees and Crowd, Magnolia Bakery on Bleecker
Service: (photo above: the crowd at Magnolia Downtown) To us, Magnolia Downtown has never been about the attentive service; the staff is largely made up of bored-looking hipsters (albeit, bored-looking hipsters who always give you great ideas for new haircuts). Nonetheless, there is sort of a charm to this type of service, and it seemed no different at the new location--same cool haircuts, same slightly-bored attitude. We'd call this one a draw.

Interior: They’ve done the new location with similarly checkered floors and retro décor; so although it is not a different look per se, we are going to give this point to Magnolia Uptown, which seems more spacious, airy and less cramped than its downtown cousin.

Maybe we're shallow but we think about these things...

Magic Cookie Bars at Magnolia DowntownMagic Cookie Bar, Magnolia Uptown
Presentation: (photos above, Magic Bars at the Downtown and Uptown locations, respectively) While both locations had similar elements of presentation: glass cases and cake plates, cupcakes on cute doilies, etc., Magnolia Uptown emerges slightly ahead in this category due to (in our opinion) their better choice of typestyle for the store signage; the simple typeface allows the baked goods themselves to shine, whereas Magnolia Downtown's more whimsical typestyle is ultimately distracting and hard to read.

Cupcakes, Magnolia DowntownCupcakes at the New Uptown Magnolia Bakery
Cuteness: (photos above, cupcakes at the Downtown and Uptown locations, respectively) While cuteness can be an open-ended category, it cannot be ignored. In evaluating the baked goods at both locations, the cuteness factor was high all around; however, if pressed we would have to say that the Downtown location's cupcakes seemed to have a jauntiness to their swirl that the Uptown location simply couldn't match.

Places to eat your cupcake: Magnolia Downtown has only one tiny table; however, there is a park directly across the street which, weather permitting, is a good place to eat your cupcake and full of great people-watching. While they are working on an added seating room Uptown, it was not yet ready at the time of our visit, leaving noplace to sit in the uptown location. Though Central Park is a short walk away, who’s going to make it that far with their cupcake? Ours was gone by the time we were halfway down the block. So while things may change when the seating area is available, in this case, Downtown wins.

But most importantly, the sweets themselves:

Cakes, Magnolia Uptown

Selection: The selection was nearly identical at both locations, with some variations in frosting choices and layer cakes available that day, but mostly the same; overall a tie.

Freshness / Quality: Everything we tasted at both locations tasted extremely fresh, which provides a happy tie (yay for fresh pastries!).

Banana PuddingBanana Pudding, Upper West Side Magnolia Bakery

The Baked Goods Themselves: (above: photos of banana pudding Downtown and Uptown, respectively) Each bakery has its own kitchen, so we wanted to see for ourselves how the tastes stacked up. In evaluating the cupcakes, we noticed that the frosting was a bit heavier-handed downtown (this is not necessarily a bad thing!); on the banana pudding, the Uptown version was a little more "whipped" than the slightly creamier version Downtown. The "Magic bars" (quite similar to the Bakedbar we featured a while back) looked slightly crisper on the bottom downtown. But really, all of this is subject to the day and baker who made them, and are natural variations; small differences aside, the taste was very similar between both locations. And yes, we liked what we tasted.

So, if you were halfway between locations and had to choose one or the other, which one would Cakespy suggest?

Well, certainly the new location has a few things going for it. For one, it's bigger; with more space, perhaps they won't even need a cupcake bouncer. But have they won us over with better typestyle choices and more seating? While on the one hand they seem to have answered a need, there was something that we realized while standing on the line Uptown to pay; we sort of...well, missed that Cupcake Bouncer and cramped space that we've cursed so many times Downtown. So while we're excited to see the Uptown addition and to monitor its growth, our hearts are still in that cramped, inefficient, sweet little spot on Bleecker Street.

Magnolia Bakery, two locations; Downtown, 401 Bleecker Street (at W. 11th St); Uptown, 200 Columbus Avenue (b/t W. 69th & W. 70th Sts); online at magnoliabakery.com.

 


Magnolia Bakery in New York

 

Sunday
Feb032008

Cake Byte: Sweet News from Cakespy


They say that while the cat's away, the mice will play. While we're not completely sure what this means, we at Cakespy have been having a wonderful time in NYC, seeking out the sweetest new developments in baking and bakery culture.

While we continue our travels and apologize for not being able to respond to all of your comments until we're back in Seattle, there is some news which simply has to be shared in the meantime:

First, we would like to report that Natalie of Bake+Destroy! is an absolute genius. Not news? OK. But did you know that she recently immortalized Cakespy artwork in a series of brilliantly propped and photographed cupcakes that she made (above)? Check out more at the Bake+Destroy Blog.

Next on the agenda: perhaps you've found yourself alone and unaccessorized in the cold, cruel month that gives us Valentine's Day? Avoid heartbreak with some good old fashioned retail therapy: Jessie Steele (whose wonderful booth we were able to visit at the NY Gift Show) is debuting hot new cupcake aprons which are available to ship on February 15th this year. Guaranteed to give you a warm and fuzzy feeling! Available at jessiesteele.com; will also be available soon at wishingfish.com.

 

Finally, are you so over the "best commercial" conversations about the super bowl? How about cutest cupcake? This year our pick goes to Sweet Avenue Bakeshop in NJ, who has made some cupcakes that made us feel happy in a Giant way. Check them out at their web site or even better, if you're in Rutherford NJ, go buy some. Even if you're not in Rutherford NJ, why not take a road trip? They're also having an Oscar Party / Vegan Ice Cream tasting tasting later this month, so clearly the Super Bowl isn't the only Giant of New Jersey.

Til we return to our regularly scheduled posting later this week: Stay Sweet!

Thursday
Jan312008

Brownies Behaving Badly: Cakespy Challenges a Classic Treat

 

DSC03676

Brownies are an impressively versatile treat; they take well to a variety of different fillings, but never lose their brownie identity. So why is it that the choices are always so...underwhelming at bakeries? Sure, you'll see the standards: fudge brownies, brownies with walnuts, and the occasional peanut butter, or perhaps mint "novelty" brownies, but nothing that really excites the palate. Luckily, we've got your back at Cakespy: recently we put brownies to the test by trying out a variety of very unexpected fillings, ranging from sweet to savory, from bitter to the completely shocking, to see what might work, what might not, and what might perhaps spawn a Brownie Great Awakening. Here are the details of our experiment:

 

Who tasted them?: Me and members of Seattle rock band Speaker Speaker.
What were the flavors?: We elected to make them in a variety of unexpected tastes and textures, and so finally settled on the following: bacon (in our case we used Morningstar farms veggie bacon), Monterey Jack Cheese, Saltines, salted peanuts, Jaffas, mint malt balls, Starburst, and Sour Patch Kids.
How did we make 'em? The recipe was a basic brownie recipe from the Betty Crocker Cookbook. They were made using a mini scone pan from Williams-Sonoma to yield little triangles; the dividers formed a nice barrier between the different types of brownies, thus making it possible to mix in the different fillings by brownie within the same batch. While we worried that perhaps the stronger flavors or smells might infuse the others another while baking, once we began tasting, this did not seem to be a problem.

And as for our expert thoughts?

First, the savories:

 

Bacon(Veggie) Bacon Brownie

(Veggie) Bacon Brownies (above): There have been a lot of bacon-and-sweets recipes going around, and while curious, we suspected that perhaps the recent popularity was largely based on shock value rather than intense tastiness. And while there is no denying that bacon in pastries provides a certain "Omigod" factor, the flavor was surprisingly good; smoky, salty, sweet, and savory, all at the same time. As taster Danny said, "It's like brownie...and then a wave of bacon". Overall, a sweet and salty success!

 

 

Monterey Jack CheeseDSC03682
Monterey Jack Cheese (above): Remnicient of a cream cheese brownie or a chocolate cheesecake but with a spicy, savory undertone, these felt and tasted very rich and satisfying. Think chocolate cheesecake, but a bit more savory. We would definitely make these ones again!

 

Saltines insteadSaltine Brownie

Saltines (above): These ones elicited the largest amount of taste associations, reminding us alternately of chocolate covered pretzels, Nestle crunch bars, and various other chocolate-with-a-crunch sweets. Overall, these went over well, probably the most "normal" tasting of the unusual flavors.

 

 

NutsDSC03683

Salted Peanuts (above): You'll see peanut butter brownies, or walnut brownies...but very rarely whole peanuts. The peanuts provided the familiar flavor of peanut butter, but with a satisfying crunch. The saltiness was rich and gave a very pleasing mouthfeel; a nice variation on an "expected" flavor.

 

And now, moving on to the sweet styles:

 

DSC03657DSC03691

Jaffas (above): They're all the rage in New Zealand (a soft-chocolate covered orange lolly candy), but we'd never heard of them until we interviewed City Down, the Cupcake Queen of New Zealand. Now we're addicted, and they're a very pleasant addition to brownies, a slightly unexpected variation on the now-ubiquitous orange and chocolate pairing.

 

 

StarburstDSC03700

Starburst (above): We placed a Starburst candy jauntily on top of the batter on this one, and guess what: It burned a hole through the brownie! You'd think we might be warned by this unholy-seeming sign but no: we ate that sucker. Our reactions were mixed: some thought they tasted very wrong, but to others, they tasted so right. Go figure.

 

 

Mint MaltballsDSC03694

Mint Malt Balls (above): We tried this to put a new spin on the chocolate-mint thing; while they were pleasant, they weren't really that different than your basic mint brownie, the malt being broken up and covered with batter to the point of having lost its crunch.

 

 

Sour Patch KidsDSC03688

Sour Patch Kids (above): What a surprise these were. None of us expected them to be delicious, but overall the sourness seemed to mix nicely with the brownies, perhaps lending a tartness that cut through the richness a little bit. A little went a long way with this flavor, but it was certainly a worthwhile experiment. Plus, baking them made the coating melt off, so that the candies resembled little jewels, making these the "prettiest" ones by far.

 

So, to sum it up? Brownies are delicious, no doubt about it. But as a treat with such an incredible range, why should we become content with so few choices? As we found in our tasting, some of the most unexpected flavors were very rewarding and surprisingly delicious. So don't be afraid to "mix it up" in your own kitchen; you might just stumble upon a happy accident!

Have you tried out something unexpected with your brownies that turned out well? Let us know!

Cakespy Note: Our apologies for not responding to your comments right away this week; we are out spying in NYC til February 7!

 

DSC03630Business Time

 

 

 

 

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